THIS BLOG INCLUDES THE LATEST REVIEWS BY BASSOCANTOR

 How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever: Tips, Tricks and Fun to Turbo-Charge Your Memory by Rob Eastaway

How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever: Tips, Tricks and Fun to Turbo-Charge Your Memory by Rob Eastaway

 How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

I had heard of this author from another of his books, and when I saw this book at the local public library, I snagged it right away.

There are lots of very clever pneumonic devices. Some I already knew, like the number-to-letter substituion trick, but others were brand new to me. Plus, there are some fantastic stories about people who had incredible memories. Like the insurance company worker who, after the company files were burned up, restored all the files from memory!

And what about that prisoner who looked at the prison keys, and then memorized how to make duplicates and escaped!

 How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

Perhaps the craziest story is about Simonides, who was able to remember people seated inside a building, and then when there was an earthquake that killed the occupants, he was able to identify the bodies by remembering their seating! 

I confess I doubted the truth of the above story, but I checked it, and by golly that is exactly right! Let's hope that I won't have to use my new memory to do that!

This is a really fun and easy book to read. You don't need to read it in any particular order. I skipped around at the various sections and learned quite a bit. But I never was able to memorize those prisoner keys. Darn!

 How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

How to Remember (Almost) Everything, Ever by Rob Eastaway

Star Trek Cats by Jenny Parks

Star Trek Cats by Jenny Parks

Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World That Can't See Clearly by Isaac Lidsky

Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World That Can't See Clearly by Isaac Lidsky